20 Ways to use Acrylic Paint

Would you like to have great materials for your next acrylic painting project? Brush, knife, piece of wood, sponge, what do you need to paint or innovate? And how do you make it possible to create different effects?

Acrylic paint has this little versatile side that allows the artist to express himself in different ways. Here is a list that opens 20 possibilities!

In ACRYLIC PAINTING, the artist can express himself with:

01| A Brush

How to Pick your Paint? All different types of viscosity (High, medium or thin)

Excellent for perfect lines, flat surfaces, glazes, and details. Some brushes are made with natural hair or synthetic fibers. Available in all shapes.

Amylee-painting-tools

Are you interested in this item? More brushes here.


02| A Roller

How to Pick your Paint? High or medium viscosity

With its compact foam that paints while rolling, this tool facilitates quick spreading of paint.

Are you interested in this item? More Foam Rollers here.


03| A Palette knife

How to Pick your Paint? High or medium viscosity

Especially for impasto and material effects. As with brushes, knives are available in different shapes.

Amylee-painting-tools

Are you interested in this item? More Palette Knives here


04| A Colour Shaper

How to Pick your Paint? High or medium viscosity

With its soft silicone tip, Colour Shapers and soft rubber tip brushes allow you to paint, mix, form and create with acrylic paint. It is easy to clean with just a rag.

Amylee Painting Tools

Are you interested in this item? More Colour shaper and rubber tip brushes here.


05| A finger

How to Pick your Paint? All different types of viscosity (High or medium or thin)

To fade, soften, mix or remove paint, fingers are sometimes very useful!

Amylee Painting Tools


06| A Toothbrush

How to Pick your Paint? Medium or thin viscosity

It’s really easy to make splattering and rubbed effects on the canvas with this tool.

Amylee Painting Tools

Are you interested in this item? More toothbrushes here


07| Pure Paint

How to Pick your Paint? Medium or thin viscosity

Some tubes have an applicator nozzle which facilitates the dosing of paint. The tips can also be found separately. Very useful for relief contours.

Amylee Painting Tools

Are you interested in this item? More applicator nozzles here.


08| Flow paint

How to Pick your Paint? Thin viscosity

Drops, spots, dripping, splattering or directly poured out of the pot, acrylic paint allows all fantasies!

Amylee Painting Tools

Are you interested in this item? More flow medium here.


09| A Comb or a Plastic Trowel

How to Pick your Paint? High or medium viscosity

To produce some graphic effects, easy shapes or effects with acrylic paint.

Amylee Painting Tools

Are you interested in this item? More combs here.


10| A Piece of Wood or Cardboard

How to Pick your Paint? All different types of viscosity (High or medium or thin)

Everything depends on the hardness of the material used and the tip made. Pointed or flared, the effect will only be more different.

Amylee Painting Tools


11| A Toothpick or a Stick

How to Pick your Paint? High or medium viscosity

To draw or etch in the impasto. The thinner the toothpick or stick the more it allows you to play with drops or spinning paint.

Amylee Painting Tools


12| A Sponge

How to Pick your Paint? Medium or thin viscosity

The irregular surface of the sponge produces abundant textured effects. Very creative!

Amylee Painting Tools

Are you interested in this item? More sponges here.


13| A Rag

How to Pick your Paint? Medium or thin viscosity

For quick work that allows all fantasies and transparent effects, a rag is just sometimes perfect. You can scrub, wipe or dab with it !

Amylee Painting Tool

Are you interested in this item? More rags here.


14| A cotton bud

How to Pick your Paint? Thin viscosity

For making dots or thick lines around shapes, a cotton bud is an original tool. It’s also well appreciated by the youngest creative people.

Amylee Painting Tool


15| A nib

How to Pick your Paint? Thin viscosity (like ink)

Soft and rigid, to draw full or thin, and give more life to a stroke, the nib is not and obvious choice but allows fine, delicate and truly unique achievements.

Amylee Painting Tool

Are you interested in this item? More nibs here.


16| A pipette

How to Pick your Paint? Thin viscosity (like ink)

To control paint, spots and especially for dosing drips better. A pipette is a very popular tool for younger creative people.

Amylee Painting Tool

Are you interested in this item? More pipettes here.


17| A Diffuser

How to Pick your Paint? Thin viscosity (like ink)

By spraying colour paint on canvas, These Fixative Diffusers are known and loved by artists. Just blow in it and it’s done!

Are you interested in this item? More diffusers here.


18| A string

How to Pick your Paint? Thin viscosity (like ink)

For an ample gesture that is well restrained, the painting plays on coloured flights and circular ripples.

Amylee Painting Tool

Are you interested in this item? More cotton weaving thread here.


19| Dripping

How to Pick your Paint? Medium or thin viscosity

To make beautiful “spaghettis” with acrylic paint, it will be necessary to mix the acrylic paint with a medium : Clear tar gel. The viscosity of the mixture takes on the appearance of honey. That’s it, you can start spinning!

Amylee Painting Tool

Are you interested in this item? More Clear tar gel here.


20| A Handmade Tool

How to Pick your Paint? All different types of viscosity (High or medium or thin)

A piece of celery or a brush made with a few bits of hay, sometimes we do not find what we are looking for in store, it is just what we meet on the way!

 Amylee Painting Tool

Think about it!

By adding auxiliaries such as gelsmodeling pastesand, just a little bit of water or some flow medium you can change all viscosity of acrylic paint. Thicker or thinner it’s up to you!

The content for this post was provided by professional fine artist, Amylee. You can visit her colourful portfolio or follow her Facebook page.

Find all the products on GreatArt Online or in our new art supply shop in London Shoreditch.

Follow GreatArt Magazine on:

Your opinion is important !

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

5 × 1 =